Wednesday 8:30 AM
Management 
Wastewater
[Presentation PDF]

Room: Governor

The Carbon Footprint of the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District

Establishing a carbon footprint for the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (District) can be viewed as a measure to manage climate change risk, indicate inefficiencies in operations, ready the District for regulations concerning carbon emissions, and institute the District's position as an environmental leader. In order to take proactive approach for future policy changes, the District's carbon footprint was calculated for the years 2005, 2008, 2009, and 2010 using the Local Government Ordinance Protocol (LGO) Protocol. Collectively, the District's carbon footprint was derived from GHG emissions from stationary combustion of natural gas and biogas; indirect GHG emissions from electricity use; direct GHG emissions from vehicular diesel and unleaded gasoline fuel combustion; methane emissions from incomplete combustion of biogas; methane and nitrous oxide emissions from biogas combustion; nitrous oxide emissions from nitrifying wastewater treatment plants without denitrification; and nitrous oxide emissions from nitrogen discharge to receiving waters. The District carbon footprints for 2005, 2008, 2009, and 2010 were determined to be 452,344 metric tons carbon dioxide equivalents (MT CO2e), 495,417 MT CO2e, 510,680 MT CO2e, and 489,300 MT CO2e, respectively. Approximately, 83% of the net positive emissions are a function of electricity use. The second highest contributor to the carbon footprint is the nitrous oxide emissions from nitrogen release to the receiving waters (~10.5%). Approximately, 19,240 MT CO2e are sequestered every year through forested and biosolids applied land.

Moderator:  Dan Collins

Presenter(s):

Joseph Kozak - MWRDGC

Joseph Kozak is a Supervising Environmental Research Scientist for the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago.  He has over fifteen years of experience in environmental, wastewater, and natural systems engineering. His current and past research includes soil-plant system modeling, limited impact development evaluation, heavy metal nitrification inhibition, sludge dewatering, UV disinfection, biological phosphorus removal, and greenhouse gas emissions from wastewater treatment.  He has over 20 published papers and has given many presentations on this research.  He holds a Bachelors in Geology from the University of Notre Dame, a Masters in Environmental Geology from Michigan State University, and a doctorate in Environmental Engineering from Northwestern University.  He is also a registered professional engineer with the state of Illinois.